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November 21, 2013

BSC basketball team and Congressman Bachus hold court at U.S. Capitol

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The Birmingham-Southern men's basketball team held court at the U.S. Capitol today. The team, which is in the Washington area to play in a Division III national men's tournament, took a "time out" from practice to tour the Capitol and meet with Congressman Spencer Bachus.

Bachus discussed the unique history and architecture of the Capitol and was presented with a signed team basketball during a gathering with players and coaches on the building's east steps. The team's tour included a visit to the Rotunda, the home to important national ceremonial events and historic statues, paintings, and decorative works depicting the heritage of the U.S.

"The sports program at Birmingham-Southern strongly values the concept of the student-athlete," Bachus said. "This visit to the U.S. Capitol fit in perfectly with the college's educational philosophy and I hope it will be a memorable part of the team's stay in Washington. It is also important for the students to know that their president, Gen. Charles Krulak, is held in the highest regard here for his dedicated service to our nation. These young men have now been on the 'home court' of American democracy, and I wish them the best of luck with their tournament this weekend and with their continuing studies."

The Panthers are playing in the Hoopsville National Invitation Classic in Owings Mills, Md., Nov. 22-24. The annual competition is the biggest on-campus tournament in Division III basketball and features top teams from across the country; 10 schools from seven different states are playing. BSC will face Salisbury University on Friday at 3 p.m. and host Stevenson University on Saturday at 4 p.m.

"Basketball is one part of the educational experience for our players," said BSC Head Coach Chris Graves. "It is great to have the opportunity to play in a national tournament, but it is very meaningful for our students to be able to come to the U.S. Capitol, learn about its history first-hand, and have time with Congressman Bachus."